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Lessons from the crisis.

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 It took only a few weeks for the Covid-19 pandemic to bring the world economy to its knees, prompting governments to take extraordinary measures to support companies in difficulty. While it is too soon to make a comprehensive evaluation of the crisis, there are some preliminary lessons to be learned. The crisis is revealing the vulnerabilities of our world, faced by global and growing risks, whether pandemics or events linked to destruction of ecosystems and climate disruption. It also reveals the economic, social and political vulnerabilities of a world based on intensive production and unbridled consumerism and mobility. One thing is certain: it is essential to understand these breaking points to make the post-crisis period a genuine opportunity to create a more sustainable, fair and resilient world.
 Like the great majority of emerging infectious diseases, Covid-19 is a zoonosis, i.e. an infectious disease that can be transmitted from animals to humans. And the significant increase in zoonotic epidemics has its main origin in the environmental degradations that modify animal interactions and those of humans with their environment. The destruction of natural habitats, climate disruption, the collapse of animal populations and the dwindling of genetic diversity increase infectious risks. Intensification of agricultural and livestock breeding practices and consumption of wild animals are party responsible for the increase in epidemics and their propagation.
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The origins of the increase in epidemics: environmental degradation.

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How to redirect and onshore our agriculture and food production.

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 The Covid-19 health crisis reveals the vulnerability of the farming and food production sector, witness the economic problems besetting many sectors and the large number of people who lack access to quality food. Conversely, more diversified, autonomous and local farming models are more resilient and allow better access to food. It is essential to make our food production more resilient and sustainable by focusing on three objectives: local production and diversification of agriculture and food production in the different regions, acceleration of the agro-ecological transition, and regulation of markets to guarantee fairer revenues and reduce the imbalances brought about by unbridled competition.
 The automobile industry is facing an unprecedented crisis. Already, two years ago, it announced a downsizing of its workforce for the years to come due to the radical transformation of the sector (automation, offshoring strategies and conversion to electric vehicles). The conversion to electric vehicles has already started but has proved sensitive to shocks. What will the situation be when we emerge from this crisis? Over and above the short-term measures required to restart the market, we must be able to draw the lessons from this world crisis. It is time to lay the foundations for a European and French industrial strategy for the automobile sector that fits with the objectives of combating air pollution and climate change. This is essential to the survival of many actors in the industry, including French carmakers.
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What future for the automobile industry?

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How can we modernize the mobility network?

 Transport infrastructure - roads, the rail network, etc. – is traditionally seen as a major post-crisis investment vector for boosting the economy. Since it has immediate effects on employment, this strategy of funding major projects is perceived as a sign of "progress" – the ideal remedy for recovering from the crisis and its consequences. But construction of new infrastructure is incompatible with respecting climate objectives over the longer term. The 2020 recovery plan must mark a change in infrastructure development policy, with a focus on renovating existing infrastructure (rail and road) and creating "soft" infrastructure, i.e. cycle tracks and pedestrian facilities.
 Onshoring a part of the economy has once again emerged as a priority with the crisis linked to the COVID-19 pandemic. This is good news because it is a fundamental means for accelerating ecological and inclusive transition, but it is a long-term process and cannot be simply decreed. To succeed, we need to act on two levels: first, in the framework of trade, by regulating globalization, and secondly through public policies adapted to the sectors targeted: agriculture, transportation, energy.
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Onshoring the economy.

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